CAC banner ad
Humor Times subscribe



Enjoy our fun collection of Single Panel Cartoons by some of the best in the business!

We’ve got a great collection of single panel cartoons by some famous, and some not-so-famous — but all very talented — cartoonists. Enjoy them all!


By Mike Baldwin. “As a young teen I rode my bike each week to my grandfather’s farm, 20 miles away to help cut his acres of lawn – and earn ten bucks,” says Mike Baldwin. “At the end of the day, I’d pore though his stack of old New Yorker magazines. I loved the cartoons and thought, Imagine, drawing cartoons for a living. I could do that – and keep my toes.” He did, and we’re glad.


By Dan Piraro. One of the greatest single panel cartoon artists in the world! Bizarro gives an eccentric, exaggerated and, as the name implies, bizarre look at everyday life. Piraro has described it as “about the incredibly surreal things that happen to all of us in our so-called ‘normal’ lives.”

Harley SchwadronHarley Schwadron

Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Harley Schwadron is a free lance cartoonist and illustrator for magazines and newspapers, large and small. He has also done hundreds of illustrations for books, magazines, op-ed pages and newsletters. After 20 years as a writer and editor he switched to full-time cartooning in l985. “Cartoons are a great combination of writing and art,” he says.

Jon CarterCartertoons

By Jon Carter. Being born on April Fool’s day was a sure sign Jon would be doing something funny someday. At 18 he landed his first regular freelance job as cartoonist for a local weekly newspaper and he’s been working neurotically on them ever since.

Ruben BollingTom the Dancing Bug

By Ruben Bolling. More of a strip than a panel, Tom the Dancing Bug is a very unique and popular weekly comic strip, appearing in fine newspapers and websites around the world, featuring insightful and hilarious social and political satire.

Jon TollerveyDr Doodle

By Jon Tollervey. Jon recently finished his PhD after following his head into academia. He has a dream (“I’m sure I’ve heard that line somewhere before,” he says) and that’s to find a job where he can combine the work that he’s doing with the drawing he loves.

Robert Waldo BrunelleMr Brunelle Explains It All

By Robert Waldo Brunelle. Robert is an artist, painter, illustrator, sculptor, art teacher and political cartoonist.

Michael Capozzola, Surveillance CaricaturesSurveillance Caricatures

By Michael Capozzola. Michael is a San Francisco-based stand-up comedian and published cartoonist. He’s contributed to The San Francisco Chronicle, National Lampoon, The New York Times, the Humor Times, McSweeney’s and Mad Magazine.

Big Monkey Comic

By Jason Coe and Hugo Camacho.

Berserk Alert!

By Tony Zuvela. Tony Zuvela was born way back in the crazy, far out, groovy sixties; ’62 in fact… He currently lives with the four people inside his head, somewhere in Australia. His Hobbies are Arthritis and Medication. In 2004 he decided to give cartooning a full-time red-hot go (the silly fool!), and he’s never looked back; partly due to the arthritis in his neck. His work has been sold, bought, used and licensed around the world. This has kept him very happy and from going sane.

Plan ‘B’ Cartoons

By Allen Purkapile. Throughout the years Allen has always done some kind of artwork. A series of shoulder operations changed the way he could use his arms. To help in the rehab, he decided to start drawing again. His daughters say, “Dad, your work is an acquired taste.” See if you think so as well!

Amateur Cartoons

You may enjoy the single panel cartoons submitted by our users as well!

To see our collections of professional cartoonists, visit our Political Cartoons sampler, our political Cartoon Galleries and our International Political Cartoons sampler. If you like to draw, you may want to submit a cartoon to our User-Created Amateur Cartoons page. If you’d like to try your hand at captioning cartoons, check our Cartoon Caption Contest. Enjoy, and please use the share buttons below. Thank you!


Excerpted from Wikipedia:
A single panel cartoon is an individual frame, or single drawing, in the multiple-panel sequence of a comic strip or comic book. A panel consists of a single drawing depicting a frozen moment.
Newspaper daily strips typically consist of either four panels or three panels, all of the same size. The horizontal newspaper strip can also employ only a single panel.
In Asia, a vertical four-panel arrangement (yonkoma) is common in newspapers, such as with Azumanga Daioh. In a comic book or graphic novel, the shapes of panels and the number of panels on a page may vary widely.
The word panel may also refer to a cartoon consisting of a single drawing; the usage is a shortened form of “single panel cartoon” or “single panel comic.” In contrast to multi-panel strips, which may involve extended dialogue in speech balloons, a typical panel comic has only one spoken line, printed in a caption beneath the panel itself. Many panel comics are syndicated and published daily, on a newspaper page with other syndicated cartoons that are collectively known as comic strips. In this context, single panel cartoons are contrasted with the more common comic strip format, which consists of an actual “strip” of multiple drawings that tell a story in sequence.
Single panel cartoons usually, but not always, are not broken up and lack continuity. The popular Dennis the Menace and The Family Circus are both single panels. Strips on the other hand are generally longer and shaped into a rectangle. Strips include Peanuts and Garfield.
Early daily strips were large, often running the entire width of the newspaper, and were sometimes three or more inches high. Initially, a newspaper page included only a single daily strip, usually either at the top or the bottom of the page. By the 1920s, many newspapers had a comics page on which many strips were collected together. Over decades, the size of daily strips became smaller and smaller, until by the year 2000, four standard daily strips could fit in an area once occupied by a single daily strip.